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Hemlock, Thomas Edison Furniture Factory (WI)

$4.20 per square foot Shipping:

Stock #: 20180108000
Availability: 350

Product Disclaimers:
Shipping and handling charges are not reflected in the purchase price, unless stated in the item description. Due to the unique nature of salvaged materials, all items are sold "AS IS". Your business is very important to us! We do the very best we can to describe and photograph each item thoroughly. Please call or email us with any questions, including shipping quotes, before purchasing an item/s. All sales are final.

Quantity:
Hemlock face-nailed boards salvaged from the Thomas Edison Furniture Factory, New London (WI)

Random widths 3 3/4", 5 3/4", 7 1/2"
Random lengths 2 1/2 feet up to about 12 feet
Thickness varies ever so slightly from 3/4" to 7/8"

Photos show a sample of the "face", which is more gray and brown, and a sample of the bottom, which is a smooth "fresh" cut-wood look. Photos never do justice to the warmth of old wood!... especially when the photo is taken by a salvager and not a photographer :) The point being think about the wood providing two options for your project, 1) a warm brown/gray sort-of weathered look, or 2) a fresh-cut lighter wood look. Then again with those two options, there are multiple options for adding color or stain, and/or sanding some or all.

We can mill into flooring, TnG cladding or use it as is... think walls, ceilings, floors, counter-tops, table tops, etc!

350 of 1820 square feet available, sold per square foot.
Ex: Want 100 square feet? Enter 100 in the Quantity box.

Call with questions, 920.232.MOON (6666)

A brief history on the Thomas Edison Furniture Factory in New London, WI ~ The Simmons Juvenile Products Co. Inc. was originally built by H.G. Andrae, who set up shop to make screen doors in 1891. He later switched to furniture because the screen door venture failed. The furniture venture also failed and the business went bankrupt in 1899. In that year the company was bought by the Wisconsin Seating Company. They manufactured chairs, including opera seats. In 1917 Thomas A. Edison, Inc. of Orange, New Jersey purchased the plant to make phonograph cabinets until 1927. Due to expansion of the radios popularity, phonographs were no longer in high demand and Edison's radio design was not ready for mass production. In order to keep the company on its feet, production was switched to furniture for children. In January, 1967 Simmons Company, a subsidary of Gulf Western, purchased the assets and renamed the company Simmons Juvenile Products. It still manufactures "little folks" furniture and employs 270-300 people year round. Simmons became a subsidiary of Gulf Western in 1978.

The Simmons Juvenile Products Co. includes roughly 15 buildings, with 300,000 sq. ft. of floor space. There are four major structures, one of which was constructed in 1891.